What happens to my pet on surgery day?

What happens on surgery day

What happens on surgery day

What happens to my pet on surgery day?

Anyone who has owned an animal has had to go through the stress and confusion of a surgical procedure for their pet. Many of my clients wonder “what happens back there?” My goal is to explain the entire surgical day for you so that you can be at ease next time.

Your pet needs to be present on surgery day between 7:30 and 8:30 am. Hopefully, they have not had any food or water since midnight. After the procedure has been discussed and the paperwork signed, your pet will be weighed and taken back to the treatment area by a technician. This area also serves as post op ICU. The patient will be given a pre op physical exam, be pre-medicated with a tranquilizer to calm and pain medicine and pre op bloodwork will be performed and analyzed. The order of the surgeries for that day are determined by procedure type and length. When it is your pet’s turn, he or she will have an IV catheter placed and then the IV anesthesia administered. Once they are sleeping, an endotracheal tube is placed. This allows a controlled flow of oxygen and anesthetic gas into the lungs. The anesthesia machine is computerized so it is virtually impossible for the wrong dose to be administered. Once the animal is under general anesthesia, the surgical area is clipped, scrubbed and sterilized. Then the pet is moved into the sterile surgical suite or the dental table. He /she will be on IV fluids, and ECG, oxygen monitor, gas scavenger and a warm water heating bed. This equipment provides the safest anesthesia. The patient’s vitals are closely monitored by a technician while I perform the surgery. After the procedure, the patient is moved into ICU so that he/she can continue to be monitored during recovery. If needed, post op pain medication is given. After the patient is awake and stable, the owners are called and given an update regarding the procedure and pick up time.

I understand the anxiety involved with surgery, I have had many procedures done on my own animals. Hopefully this will answer your questions and ease your concerns. If not, feel free to call us and discuss any questions you have regarding surgery.

Dr. Lynlee Wessels DVM

 

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